4 quick tips for a racist

how to be a racistSalt Lake County Republican Party Chair Chad Bennion has come under fire (rightly so!) for asserting that Salt Lake County District Attorney Sim Gill’s Indian heritage somehow prevents him from doing his job. Instead of apologizing for his blatantly racist accusation, Bennion has decided to stand by his comment.

Bennion obviously doesn’t get it. So, here are four quick tips (in order of their suggested use) for a racist. Listen up, Chad.

  1. Apologize profusely for your racist language and agree to avoid that kind of language in the future (Bonus: go the extra mile and meet with the group you’ve denigrated).
  2. Deny your comment was racist and instead chalk it up to a vocal flub.
  3. Accuse your listeners of being too sensitive and politically correct, insist they merely misunderstood you.
  4. Never, ever double-down on what you said.

 

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4 thoughts on “4 quick tips for a racist”

  1. I don’t know Sim Gill, but I spent a few years working with his dad. His father is a good man. I know many of the leaders of the Sikh temple in Utah.

    I think Chad Bennion is badly referring to what Sim himself has said, but not doing a great job of doing it, or the press is not connecting the dots.

    http://voicesofutah.wordpress.com/2012/03/08/from-india-to-district-attorney-sim-gill-fights-for-salt-lake-county/

    (from that account)
    Gill, 52, spoke in a faint Indian accent of a formative moment from his youth, to a classroom of 13 students recently at the University of Utah. At the age of “eight or nine” in his native India, Gill said, he witnessed the brutal beating of a man accused of stealing jewelry from a neighbor’s home, and in the end, the beating of an innocent man.

    “That left a very strong impression on me,” Gill said, “that when you have that authority, when you have that power, when you have that capacity to alter and impact people’s lives, you have to really use that with a great level of deference and responsibility.”

    I believe Utah has seen a large problem from Ogden to other places in the state of an abuse of power by a few members of the police, based on the 4th amendment and state law. I have no problem with Sim Gill calling them on it.

    1. Thanks for reading and commenting. The problem with Chad Bennion’s comment is not that what he is referring to is factually incorrect. As you’ve pointed out, Gill did say that his upbringing as a child in India has influenced his views on justice (clearly for the better). Bennion’s comment is racist because it assumes that Gill’s upbringing, uniquely situated as it was in India, disqualifies him from being an effective DA. It’s not just the witnessing of police brutality that has Bennion so riled up, but that that brutality was witnessed in India by an Indian-American. If Bennion has a problem with Gill’s juridical philosophy, well, that’s one thing. But in two separate Tribune articles Bennion has stated specifically that it is Bennion’s upbringing (where he saw the police brutality) that taints his ability to do his job. It begs a fundamental question: if Gill had been born and raised in the United States and seen police brutality, would Bennion be calling him out on it?

  2. I don’t know Sim Gill, but I spent a few years working with his dad. His father is a good man. I know many of the leaders of the Sikh temple in Utah.

    I think Chad Bennion is badly referring to what Sim himself has said, but not doing a great job of doing it, or the press is not connecting the dots.

    http://voicesofutah.wordpress.com/2012/03/08/from-india-to-district-attorney-sim-gill-fights-for-salt-lake-county/

    (from that account)
    Gill, 52, spoke in a faint Indian accent of a formative moment from his youth, to a classroom of 13 students recently at the University of Utah. At the age of “eight or nine” in his native India, Gill said, he witnessed the brutal beating of a man accused of stealing jewelry from a neighbor’s home, and in the end, the beating of an innocent man.

    “That left a very strong impression on me,” Gill said, “that when you have that authority, when you have that power, when you have that capacity to alter and impact people’s lives, you have to really use that with a great level of deference and responsibility.”

    I believe Utah has seen a large problem from Ogden to other places in the state of an abuse of power by a few members of the police, based on the 4th amendment and state law. I have no problem with Sim Gill calling them on it.

    1. Isaac Holyoak

      Thanks for reading and commenting. The problem with Chad Bennion’s comment is not that what he is referring to is factually incorrect. As you’ve pointed out, Gill did say that his upbringing as a child in India has influenced his views on justice (clearly for the better). Bennion’s comment is racist because it assumes that Gill’s upbringing, uniquely situated as it was in India, disqualifies him from being an effective DA. It’s not just the witnessing of police brutality that has Bennion so riled up, but that that brutality was witnessed in India by an Indian-American. If Bennion has a problem with Gill’s juridical philosophy, well, that’s one thing. But in two separate Tribune articles Bennion has stated specifically that it is Bennion’s upbringing (where he saw the police brutality) that taints his ability to do his job. It begs a fundamental question: if Gill had been born and raised in the United States and seen police brutality, would Bennion be calling him out on it?

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