Coalition for Compassionate Utah Grows with Four New Groups

Salt Lake City — Just three weeks after it’s initial launch, the Coalition for a Compassionate Utah (www.compassionateutah.org) continues to grow with the addition of four new non-profit groups. The Coalition has since generated over 1,000 emails and phone calls by ordinary Utahns, asking Gov. Herbert to expand medicaid.

The newest members of the Coalition include the Fourth Street Clinic, the Gandhi Alliance for Peace, Utah Disability Caucus and the National Council of Jewish Women, Utah Section.

With the addition of these groups, the Coalition now includes 15 non-profit groups, covering not only healthcare and poverty issues, but also religious, environmental and labor-focused issues.

“An already strong coalition just got stronger with the addition of these groups to the Coalition for a Compassionate Utah,” said Maryann Martindale, executive director of the Alliance for a Better UTAH. “We expect the Coalition will continue to grow as we anxiously await the Governor’s decision on Medicaid expansion.”

The Coalition for a Compassionate Utah has recently received national attention for it’s ability to bring together diverse nonprofits. Nonprofit Quarterly, a research-based journal that specializes in the study and best practices of nonprofits, highlighted the Coalition as a positive example of nonprofit coalition building.

Existing members include Alliance for a Better UTAH, Voices for Utah Children, League of Women Voters of Utah, Utahns Against Hunger, Utah Parents Against Gun Violence, Planned Parenthood Action Council, Equality Utah, Sierra Club, Utah AFL/CIO, Utah Votes, and HEAL Utah Fourth Street Clinic, the Gandhi Alliance for Peace, Utah Disability Caucus and the National Council of Jewish Women, Utah Section.

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Alliance for a Better UTAH |  801.557.1532   | www.betterutah.org
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The Alliance for a Better UTAH is a year-round, multi-issue education and advocacy organization providing resources, commentary, and action on important public policy matters.

 

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